A Repurposed Life…

A repurposed life...

A repurposed life…

 

There was a time when we didn’t all live such throwaway lives.  People had to make do and reuse in a really thoughtful, useful way out of necessity rather than choice.  I think this project is an homage to that kind of frugality.

I had a pair of inexpensive pot holders that were well past their shelf life.  Stained, busted and disgusted…I needed a new pair.  It would have been easy enough to go buy them, but I have been hankering for ways to use the many scraps of vintage fabric I have and this seemed like a simple enough project that wouldn’t require too much time or effort.

The short of it is that I trimmed the old pot holders down into squares and essentially made slipcovers using scraps from a vintage grain sack.

Photos below.

I hope you find some inspiration.

Always,

Cindy

Remember to click each picture twice to biggify!

 

Vintage French Monogram Linen Sofa Slipcover

 

Pieced together to showcase the lovely handwork with a decorative stitch for some flare.

Pieced together to showcase the lovely handwork with a decorative stitch for some flare.

When I go to the Round Top Antiques Show, one way I treat myself is to pick up some vintage french sheets.  The trick is figuring out a way to use them wisely and showcase the lovely hand embroidered initials.  Last year, I did a monogram headboard slipcover using my special vintage finds.

One of my other projects is a love seat slip cover, along with a side table slipcover.  In the case of the love seat, I had to cut and sew the fabric and piece it together in order to keep the embroidery front and center.  The side table is a simple IKEA side table that I slip covered with leftover fabric from the sofa project.  Some piping and antique lace helped to upgrade this unremarkable modern table.

Since this is a transitional time between Winter and Spring (spring if you go by our weather for the last couple of days) the rest of my decor is refined and edited as we look ahead to warmer weather.  In the living room with the slipcovered sofa, I styled the fireplace mantle by using vintage mercury ornaments as vase filler along with the (now) dried pepperberry branches leftover from the holidays, I feel like I am keeping a nod to winter, but looking ahead to a crisp clean spring time.

I hope you find some inspiration.

Always,

Cindy

Vintage all the way around.

Vintage all the way around.

White 1750's cabinet set against the contemporary IKEA table.

White 1750’s cabinet set against the contemporary IKEA table.

 

Piping detail and vintage lace make this slipcover very special.

Piping detail and vintage lace make this slipcover very special and turns a run-of-the-mill table into something with great vintage styling.

Matte White Potter, Ironstone Pitcher and candles wrapped with velvet ribbon.

Matte White Potter, Ironstone Pitcher and candles wrapped with velvet ribbon.

 

Old linen runner that is a family heirloom along with an antique alabaster lamp.

Old linen runner that is a family heirloom along with an antique alabaster lamp.

Old onion skin typewriter paper with a german glass glitter starfish for a paper weight.

Old onion skin typewriter paper with a german glass glitter starfish for a paper weight.

 

She is a big, silly sweet girl.

She is a big, silly sweet girl.

Simple and edited.  Rustic against the refined.

Simple and edited. Rustic against the refined.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Heart of Chocolate Ganache

If only my reality were as artful as my imagination.

Rice Crispies treats, cut in a heart shape to celebrate the day with a quick coffee infused chocolate ganache with orange zest drizzle.

In a double boiler:

1/2 c. heavy cream

8 oz of semi sweet chocolate chips

1 t. instant coffee granuals

zest of two oranges

Combine in top of double boiler until chocolate is melted, stirring regularly.

A little treat…for any day, not just heart day.

I hope you find some inspiration.

Always,

Cindy

Chocolate and orange…what a great flavor pairing.

Ganache in a pastry bag, ready to pipe.

Random drizzle. Couldn’t be easier.

How can these be called scraps?

Orange slices as a hint of what is to come.

 

Discovery: Save-on-crafts.com

Simple Lines.

One of my favorite “go to” websites is  save-on-crafts.com.  Not only does it have craft items that can be used in a myriad of projects, it offers finished, decorative elements at fairly good price points that fit in cottage and country decor.  Once I started mining the website, I was pleasantly surprised of all their offerings.

Websites like this that carry so many interesting things always seem to spark my imagination and inspire me.  I have pictured and linked to some of my favorites (of the moment) below:

I hope that you find some inspiration, too.

Always,

Cindy

Vintage Reproduction Bottle.

So small and quaint…I am sure I could do something with this.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/honeybottle.html

Zinc flower pot.

Scalloped edge tin has a french feel.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/flowerbucket3.html

 

This small table top tub has the look and feel of ironstone.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/ceramicdish.html

 

I love these footed tin vases. My head is brimming with ideas for these.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/flowerbuckets2.html

 

I could see this as a lantern or a showcase for collected treasures.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/glasscase.html

 

Love this tin lantern. Has a colonial feel to it.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/metallantern1.html

 

Grey chipped bar stool.

It comes in red, too!

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/barstool.html

 

Reproduction vintage padlocks that really work. Great!

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/padlockandkeys1.html

Rustic zinc tin, great for lining with parchment and filling with edible goodies.

http://www.save-on-crafts.com/tinpots.html

Fireplace Envy

The light palette.

For a girl who has always loved the crackling sound of a real fire place, one could argue I made a bit of an error buying a house with no fireplace.  And if one did argue that, they’d be right.  My only defense is that I fell in love with this little jewel so quickly, I dismissed the issue.  The next best thing, though, is a faux fireplace.

It also seems a little unusual to be talking about fireplaces, faux or otherwise, when the weather is so warm here today.  As you can see in the picture above, the weather was temperate enough to open the windows and doors.  No complaints, we’ll just enjoy the weather while we can.

The one I am featuring in this article is one I build myself using bricks, pavers, wood, molding and wood decorative elements were all off the shelf products from the home store.  The design came from my head and the rest came together as it usually does with me…on an ad hoc basis.  I just always have faith these little projects will pull together in the end.  Turns out I am right about that around 50% of the time:)

The mantle itself is pretty straightforward.  The only suggestion I would offer is to make sure you notch the bottom of each side to fit over the molding at the bottom of the wall so that your mantle sits flush against it.  As with many things…it is the small details that count and that one is an important one in order to create a fireplace that reads as close to the real thing as possible.

The insert is just a series of bricks staggered and angled, secured with generic construction adhesive, with a plywood backing for stability.  A fair warning would be that once this fireplace is assembled in the place where it stands…it is difficult to move because the brick insert is extremely heavy.  If I did another one, I would work a little harder at finding the brick tiles that are about 3/4 of an inch thick…so if you tackle this kind of project, give that option some serious thought.

When creating the insert with bricks (real or tiles) you will have to cut some of the bricks where the edge of the insert meets the mantle.  This is actually very easy.  For a few dollars your can find a chisel and using a rubber mallet, cut the brick pretty quick.

As far as the “fire” goes…you have many options.  For safety, I would suggest a small string of twinkly Christmas lights.  The twinkle mimics the crackling of the fire and is quite cozy.  Or you can get electric inserts that use real logs and a well placed light bulb to mimic the flame.  The home store carries and inexpensive model at a cost of around $45.

I have spent the bulk of this article talking about the fireplace itself, but the styling is really what brings it home and makes it fit in my little cottage.  I have strived for a more edited look and lighter pallete.  If I can accomplish that, then it will fit right in with everything esle.

The pictures that follow show how I built the faux fireplace and the styling of it.

I hope you find some inspiration.

Always,

Cindy

Apron. Fluting. Medallian. Molding.

Nothing fancy. Stock fluted molding and medallian from the homestore.

 

Simple pavers create the hearth of the faux fireplace.

Brick insert built with angled walls.

Brick platform for the candlesticks.

 

The ornate detail of the candle mirrors the detail of the vintage gas fireplace insert.

Tarnish patina only serves to showcase the design of the candle sticks.

 

What you can’t see.

An old gas heater provides the feel; candles provide the dancing light.

Beauty in the details.

Straightforward mantle design sprang from my head.

Simple styling is the order of the day.

Unusually and delightfully warm winter day; open door juxtaposed with the faux fireplace.

A collection of architectural objects.

Elements in found condition, respecting their journey.